Posts Tagged ‘philosophy’

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A Tanking Primer: Adaptability

August 11, 2009

uldapowWelcome back to the Tanking Primer series here at Going Bearfoot! Here we’ll explore a new aspect of tanking each week for the next several weeks, continuing with today’s topic, Adaptability. My hope is that I’ll manage to stay objective enough to cover tanking aspects without making this a “druid only” resource, and even include things specific to my warrior, paladin, and death knight brethren.

Tanking Primer Table of Contents

1. The Pull

2. Tank Talk

3. Adaptability

4. To be continued…

The World of Warcraft, like the “Real World” ™, is usually in some state of flux, and while you’re tanking there will always be patrols, groups with casters, groups without casters, bugs, lagspikes, awful PuGed people, and Cenarius knows what else. Your job then, is to always be prepared to deal with things, shift around, and make changes on the fly.

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A Tanking Primer: Tank Talk

July 28, 2009

heartrazorWelcome to a brand new series I’ll be starting here on Going Bearfoot, a Tanking Primer! Here we’ll explore a new aspect of tanking each week for the next several weeks, continuing with today’s topic, Tank Talk. My hope is that I’ll manage to stay objective enough to cover tanking aspects without making this a “druid only” resource, and even include things specific to my warrior, paladin, and death knight brethren.

Tanking Primer Table of Contents

1. The Pull

2. Tank Talk

3. Adaptability

4. To be continued…

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One of the strange things that has evolved over time in this game is that the tank is the leader. It’s entirely possible for a healer or a DPS to take charge and direct a group, but it’s a lot harder to do so. One reason for this is that it generally falls to the tank to be party leader for the sake of using raid markings to show priority kills. (Raid markings can be used for a strange concept called “crowd control” too, but this is a very ancient concept that no longer seems to apply to the world…) Because it falls to the tank to lead 85% of the time, it’s important that you find a way to establish yourself as the leader right off the bat, and remain in that position for as long as you need to work with your group.

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Herding Cats, AKA …Let’s go to Plan B, shall we?

June 9, 2009

Blades-Tag

So. This is what happens when guild drama explodes at a somewhat late hour on a Monday night. I think more than anything I’m probably confused by what happened, but generally I’m proud to be a card-carrying charter member and senior officer of the newly formed <Blades of Dawn>.

Being in the position at the moment, I’d like to take this white space and talk about guilds and guild management. There are a few things that I think are absolutely essential to having a healthy guild.

  • A mission statement, and defined direction for the guild.
  • A reliable officer core that is both larger than the one person leading the guild, smaller than 20% of the guild (or so), and shares a reasonable amount of power with the leader.
  • Defined rules about behavior within the guild, when running with PuGs and a general looting policy.
  • An application with recruiting policy.
  • A trial period with a defined end point.
  • Semi-regular guild meetings.
  • More than 4 events a month, less than 25.

Things that are nice to have but not essential include:

  • A forum, with “News” section or splash page.
  • Themed officer roles.

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Why the Old Country is also the “Motherland”

May 5, 2009

logo-warcraftNerd that I am, and addicted as I am, WoW Insider is my home page. Whenever I open Firefox, unless its by taking a link from somewhere else, WoW Insider is the thing that pops up. I don’t agree with a lot of things, or even most things that get put up there (And I’m seriously sick to death of hearing about Karatechop. SRSLY guys, find something new!) But it sits there anyway because it’s a good place to get a quick run down of some of the big news that comes up. In the vein of not really agreeing with things, one of the articles this morning was titled “The End of Vanilla WoW” in which the idea was proposed that now that we have Death Knights and all, leveling any other class is simply too much work.

Now, there are two philosophies to approaching the game. (Really there are far, far, more philosophies to the game than I could ever cover, but right now we’re talking about leveling and it’s my blog-o-verse so I can simplify it as much as I want to. Neener neener neener!) One is that Warcraft is a great game with tons of content that works for a number of playstyles, and another is that “The game doesn’t actually start until max level.” I’m in the former camp. The concept that everything is crud until you hit 80 (Or 70, or 60 back in the day, probably 90 in the future) makes me wonder why people even got hooked enough to level their first character up anyway. Read the rest of this entry ?

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For Freedom

April 21, 2009

butterfly3Today I’m not going to talk about Warcraft, roleplaying, tanking, or even another game altogether. This last Sunday afternoon my father passed, and I’m going to take this space here to leave a memorial for him. Please feel free to comment.

When I was just a kid in kindergarten (or maybe first grade- it doesn’t really matter which), my dad took off the entire day from work to stay home. After I left for school, he snuck into my room and pulled out my Lincoln Log building set. When I got home that afternoon, the entire kitchen table was a huge “Old West” cowboy fortress being attacked by Indians and we spent hours playing through the battle.

Another time, a weekend in February, there was going to be a blue moon; a second full moon in the same month. It was special because February is a very short month, so the odds of it happening in February are extremely slim. He set up his telescope out in the backyard and taught me not only what a blue moon is, but about the craters on the moon and how he was watching when the first man walked around on the surface. How things in the sky always move across from East to West so we had to make sure to keep changing the telescope so we could see things.

Almost every summer we’d go camping, and when I got older I could even help back in and level the trailer. I always thought it was “soft” camping (and still do) but you were right that it’s nice to have pancakes in the middle of the woods in the morning. We never did have to argue about whether campfires were better built “pyramid” or “cabin” style though, because with enough beer and propane anything will light, even without kindling.

I think it was in Starved Rock campground where you took us and I remember seeing sandstone for the first time. I couldn’t even imagine how all that sand could have gotten there to make a rock out of, but it stuck with me and now I’ve gone off to college for Geology. Illinois was under the ocean! Who knew!

Things didn’t always go smoothly between us, but I’ll always love the black & white version of The Day the Earth Stood Still (the new one sucks), and I’ll always prefer and old, solid, durable tool to a new, cheap, and plastic one. I hope all the best brands of beer are in stock for ya, Dad. I love you.

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On the Elemental Spirits

April 7, 2009

firelordSo once again Etsugal and I were musing about aspects of Azeroth that are probably way to deep for anyone to muse about… except that we’re roleplayers and that’s just what you do. This time, it’s about elementals and the Elemental Plane.

The rule about elementals is that you do not talk about elementals. I mean, they’re trapped in the elemental plane. It’s actually somewhat strange that we have a character class entirely devoted to communing with and working with elementals because in their own way, elementals are Bad Guys. Way back in the day, before the titans, the elementals were the servants, lap dogs, and soldiers of the Old Gods. Old Gods are bad. They’re like… Well like the Aztec gods. Like Huitzilpochtli demanding hundreds of blood sacrifices to not destroy the world.

In any case, the titans arrive, lay out a picnic and sit around discussing how very fine this whole world would be if only those party pooper Old Gods would stuff it and let them enjoy their pimento loaf sandwiches. Well, like any good picnic nuisance, the Old Gods couldn’t just up and stop being annoying, so the Titans created the Elemental Plane, locked the elementals there, and then shoved the Old Gods down below the ground and figured they were done. At this point they start building things like dwarves and gnomes and Uldaman, Uldum, Uludar,…and a bunch of other things that begun with “Ul” too, I’m sure. Not very creative, were they? What this leaves us with, then, is a bunch of elementals from four opposing factions shoved together in one little prison. And this is where we come in. Read the rest of this entry ?

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In which there was a lot of pondering.

February 24, 2009

Edit: This post is somewhat out of date as of… well, most of Wrath, actually. It reflects ideas based on game/quest/lore design that doesn’t really exist, especially since the chaos of the Cataclysm. It has nothing to do with a world in which Moira Bronzebeard is trying to rule the dwarves or a world in which Garrosh has visited Azeroth and become a faction leader.

While portions of both factions maintain some of the aspects I’ve highlighted here, the broad generalizations are much less accurate than they had been.

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So Etsugal and I were sitting around having lunch yesterday, and somehow go on the subject of Warcraft lore, and how everyone has a side. It was brought up how the Alliance is always seen as the “Good Guys” and the Horde, depending on point of view, are “Bad Guys” or at the very least “Monsters that Don’t Deserve to Live”. From this point, as is natural in rambling conversations about fictional universes that keep us from doing the homework due in two hours, it then branched out and we explored the classic Warcraft villains and heroes and tried to define what exactly we were talking about.

Now, the first way that we tried to define evil was, “Destruction. Ultimate selfishness, something for you on someone else’s tab. (Be it their money, time, or their physical, emotional, or psychological well-being.)” A hero, then, was someone who did things at personal cost for a moral or ideal. One caviot, of course, is that a hero to one side of a situation is often a villain to the opposite side. For example, the Burning Legion are Bad Guys; they want destruction and a world of their choosing at the expense of lots of other people. The Scarlet Crusade has lots of people fighting for a cause that actually does have good intentions, I mean: who doesn’t want to see the Scourge eradicated? On the other hand, they also want to kill us and anyone that isn’t human and part of their order so… Heroes? Sure. My heroes? Not so much.

I liked this because by these definitions, a farmer in the third war just trying to get the harvest in before fleeing the country from the Scourge is a hero. He could flee and be safe, but he knows that the army needs food and so he puts himself in danger for the sake of a greater cause.

And then I remembered a much better explanation of it all…

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